Discography

love fail

love fail
(Canteloupe [CA21100])

David Lang's meditation on the timelessness of love

Purchase love fail at:

The Bang on a Can Store

Band Camp


iTunes


Track List

Track
Piece
Time
1
he was and she was
8:47
2
break #1 (three years)
0:24
3
dureth
1:16
4
A Different Man
1:18
5
the wood and the vine
8:05
6
Right and Wrong
2:24
7
you will love me
2:48
8
Forbidden Subjects
3:06
9
as love grows stronger
5:47
10
break #2 (instrumental)
0:19
11
The Outing
1:53
12
I live in pain
4:08
13
Head, Heart
3:15
14
break #3 (If I have to drown)
2:49
15
mild, light
4:41
Listen to Samples
Samples Not Available yet. Check back later.

Reviews of love fail


love fail Program Notes

David Lang's meditation on the timelessness of love

Why is it that people still like the story of Tristan and Isolde? It has been told repeatedly for almost 1000 years, in many different versions, with all manner of strange details added or changed. “The greatest love story ever!” But why? Of course, there is excitement, drama, love, lust, shame, death, dragons. I think the real reason why is because the love of Tristan and Isolde begins by accident— they drink a love potion. They didn’t mean to drink it, and they didn’t mean to fall in love. They drink and—BAM!—it starts. It is almost a laboratory experiment into what love might be like without any of the complications of how real love begins or works—without the excitement, embarrassment, frustration, guilt or competition present in the courtships of ordinary people.

I thought I might learn something about love if I could explore this in a piece, putting details abstracted from many different retellings of Tristan and Isolde next to texts that are more modern, more recognizable to us, more real. First I scoured the literature and took my favorite weird incidents from the originals; for example, in Marie de France’s version, Tristan carves his name on a stick for Isolde to find, she sees it and immediately knows what message Tristan means to convey, and that message—incredibly—is many many pages long. Another example: Tristan and Isolde drink the potion, thinking it is wine, and Gottfried von Strassburg writes, dramatically, that it isn’t wine they are drinking, but a cup of their never-ending sorrow. (This, near the chapter in which Gottfried lists all the other Germanic poets working in the 12th century, and then tells you how he rates among them.) I compiled the oddest incidents from these versions of their romance, took out all the names or technological information that would make the texts seem ancient, and put them next to stories by the contemporary author Lydia Davis. These stories are oddly similar to the Tristan stories—they are also about love, honor and respect between two people, but they are much more recognizable to us.

I based my words on scraps of the text I found on the internet—thank you google translate! I do want to acknowledge the translations of Robert W. Hanning & Joan Ferrante, A.T. Hatto, and Alan S. Fedrick, whose versions of these texts I consulted more than once.

Copyright 2017
ANONYMOUS 4® is a federally registered trademark of Anonymous 4 LLC for entertainment services and musical sound recording

Home Page About Us A4 News Concert Schedule Meet A4Frequently Asked QuestionsPublications
Catching up with RuthCatching up with MarshaCatching up with SusanCatching up with JacquiCatching up with Johanna Contact A4
Discography:   Three Decades of Anonymous 4 1865 Marie et Marion love fail The Drop That Contained the Sea Secret Voices
The Cherry Tree Four Centuries of Chant Gloryland Noel The Origin of Fire American Angels
Wolcum Yule Darkness into Light la bele marie The Second Circle 1000: A Mass for the End of Time Legends of St. Nicholas
A Lammas Ladymass 11,000 Virgins Christmas Music from Medieval Hungary Miracles of Sant'Iago The Lily & The Lamb Love's Illusion
On Yoolis Night An English Ladymass Richard Einhorn's Voices of Light A Portrait of Anonymous 4
Photo Galleries: A4 Album Publicity

Website Design by J2